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Panda Romance Stems From Bamboo

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Panda Romance Stems From Bamboo

World

Panda Romance Stems From Bamboo

Panda Romance Stems From Bamboo

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Conservationists in China hope it'll be a great aphrodisiac for endangered wild pandas. In the mountains of Sichuan and Gansu provinces, the wild panda population has been split up by developments and rivers, which has made it hard for many pandas to find mates. A new panda corridor between the southern and northern parts of the mountains is being planted with tasty bamboo. Scientists hope it will attract hungry pandas, and help them mate.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Okay, so you can use bamboo to make floors, clothing and sheets. But how about sparking a romance? Maybe not for humans, but conservationists in China hope it'll be a great aphrodisiac for endangered wild pandas. In the mountains of Sichuan and Gansu provinces, the wild panda population has been split by developments in rivers, which has made it hard for many pandas to find mates.

A new panda corridor between the southern and northern parts of the mountains is now being planted with tasty bamboo. Scientist hope it will attract hungry pandas and help the pandas, well, fall in love.

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