Red Rock Island Offers a Spot Off San Francisco

Red Rock Island is rich in manganese, the oxidized metal that gives it a red appearance. i i

hide captionRed Rock Island is rich in manganese, the oxidized metal that gives it a red appearance.

Dani Vernon
Red Rock Island is rich in manganese, the oxidized metal that gives it a red appearance.

Red Rock Island is rich in manganese, the oxidized metal that gives it a red appearance.

Dani Vernon
The Richmond San Rafael Bridge is just north of the i i

hide captionThe Richmond San Rafael Bridge is just north of the island.

Dani Vernon
The Richmond San Rafael Bridge is just north of the

The Richmond San Rafael Bridge is just north of the island.

Dani Vernon

David Glickman, who bought Red Rock Island in San Francisco Bay in 1964 for less than $50,000, hopes to sell it for $22 million. He says he bought the island because he is interested in unusual, off-beat places.

The island is reached by traveling north from the San Francisco waterfront, heading past Alcatraz Island.

Deb Self, the executive director of an environmental group called Bay Keeper, says the island has great environmental significance.

"It's a major corridor for migrating fish, and home to a lot of birds," Self said, "and close to some important seal rookeries and also is home to a fair sized population of black-crested night Herons.

The fate of the 6-acre piece of rock, and its spectacular views, remains in question as it awaits a buyer. As for David Glickman, he currently lives in Thailand.

Scott Shafer reports from member station KQED in San Francisco.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: