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'The Souls of Black Folk'

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'The Souls of Black Folk'

'The Souls of Black Folk'

100th anniversary of the book by W.E.B. DuBois

'The Souls of Black Folk'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1384569/1385051" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Hear Professor Farrah Griffin talk about how she grew to understand the book.

Only Available in Archive Formats.

Listen to Composer T. J. Anderson, who first read 'Souls' in 1946.

Only Available in Archive Formats.

Listen to Professor Gerald Horne, who first encountered 'The Souls of Black Folk' in the 1960s.

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Carolyn Maun talks about teaching 'The Souls of Black Folk.' at Morgan State University.

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'The Souls of Black Folk' Modern Library hide caption

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Modern Library

W.E.B. DuBois from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Records, Library of Congress. hide caption

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from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Records, Library of Congress.
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W. E. B. DuBois' exploration of America's ongoing struggle with race still resonates today. NPR's Michele Norris presents a re-examination of The Souls of Black Folk, on the book's 100th anniversary.

A founding member of the NAACP, DuBois was an educator and scholar who wrote hundreds of essays in addition to more than 20 books. The Souls of Black Folk received mixed reviews when it was first published in 1903, but it captured the imagination of the public, became DuBois' most famous work and continues to influence America's ongoing debate about race.