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Is Hurricane Dean a Sign of Storms to Come?

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Is Hurricane Dean a Sign of Storms to Come?

Environment

Is Hurricane Dean a Sign of Storms to Come?

Is Hurricane Dean a Sign of Storms to Come?

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This week, Hurricane Dean stormed Jamaica then slammed Mexico's coast, earning a place in the record books. When it reached the Yucatan Peninsula, Dean was a Category 5 hurricane — the first since 1992's Andrew to make landfall in the Atlantic region. Is Dean just business as usual, or global warming at work?

Chris Mooney, Washington correspondent for Seed Magazine and author of Storm World: Hurricanes, Politics, and the Battle Over Global Warming

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Storm World

Hurricanes, Politics, and the Battle Over Global Warming

by Chris Mooney

Hardcover, 392 pages |

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Storm World
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Hurricanes, Politics, and the Battle Over Global Warming
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Chris Mooney

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