NPR logo

Astronomers Find a 'Hole' in the Universe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14087745/14087737" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Astronomers Find a 'Hole' in the Universe

Space

Astronomers Find a 'Hole' in the Universe

Astronomers Find a 'Hole' in the Universe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14087745/14087737" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Evidence of a "cold spot" in the Cosmic Microwave Background is shown in the diagram on the left. On the right, data from the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey shows lower than expected radio emissions. Rudnick et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF, NASA hide caption

toggle caption Rudnick et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF, NASA

Evidence of a "cold spot" in the Cosmic Microwave Background is shown in the diagram on the left. On the right, data from the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey shows lower than expected radio emissions.

Rudnick et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF, NASA

Scientists have found a space nearly a billion light-years across that contains nothing — no stars, gas, galaxies, or mysterious dark matter that astronomers believe makes up much of the universe. The scientists who performed the study explain what it might mean to find... nothing.

Lawrence Rudnick, professor, Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota

Liliya Williams, associate professor, Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.