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A Pageant Queen's Bad Moment, Snared by Web

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A Pageant Queen's Bad Moment, Snared by Web

Digital Life

A Pageant Queen's Bad Moment, Snared by Web

A Pageant Queen's Bad Moment, Snared by Web

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14112458/14112795" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Miss Teen South Carolina was humiliated on the Web this week when her attempt to answer one of those innocuous pageant questions went horribly awry.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

Lauren Caitlin Upton of Lexington, South Carolina, learned this week how 15 seconds of fame can turn into five days of ridicule on YouTube. In the Miss USA Teen Pageant, the 17-year-old was asked why so many Americans can't find the United States on a map.

Ms. LAUREN CAITLIN UPTON (Contestant, Miss USA Teen Pageant): I believe that our education, like, such as in South Africa and the - Iraq everywhere, like, such as and I believe that they should - our education over here in the U.S. should help the U.S., or should help South Africa, and should help the Iraq, and the Asian countries.

SIMON: Hmm. She went on and all week, people have been going on about her. But as all of us - we have to do it can report, speaking live into a microphone can rearrange all your gray matter. I know. You can say like and such silly things such as over and the Iran and the France and other such places like the Ireland and the Indian Asiatic countries. But what did people expect? It was the Miss Teen USA Pageant, not oral exams at MIT.

Lauren Upton says she's interested in set design and graphic arts. She volunteers at a place in South Carolina that serves meals to abused women and their children. They probably don't care how she answered that silly old question anyway.

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