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Mars Watch

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Mars Watch

Mars Watch

Mars Watch

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1413192/1413193" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Early Wednesday morning, Mars will come the closest it has been to our planet in nearly 60,000 years. Mars is now shining at its absolute brightest, so astronomers and curious stargazers have taken to looking sky-ward in the past several days, to see details on Mars' surface that have never been clearer. NPR's Melissa Block spent one recent evening with some amateur astronomers from the Northern Virginia Astronomy Club, looking at Mars and observing their fascination with our closest planetary neighbor.

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