NPR logo

Civil Rights Conference

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1414389/1414390" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Civil Rights Conference

Civil Rights Conference

Civil Rights Conference

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1414389/1414390" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In his 1903 book "The Souls of Black Folk," writer W.E.B. DuBois predicted that the true problem of 20th-century America would be what he called "the color line." The Civil Rights Project at Harvard University Law School has convened the Color Lines Conference to discuss how far the civil rights movement has come in the 100 years since DuBois' book, and how far it has left to go.

Guest:

Andrew Grant-Thomas
*Director of the Color Lines Conference at the Civil Rights Project at Harvard University

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.