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Officials Note Progress in Anbar, but Death Toll Rises

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Officials Note Progress in Anbar, but Death Toll Rises

Iraq

Officials Note Progress in Anbar, but Death Toll Rises

Officials Note Progress in Anbar, but Death Toll Rises

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14248768/14248749" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the run-up to the report by Gen. David Petraeus, U.S. military and political leaders repeatedly point to one relative bright spot: Anbar province.

In the past year, there have been reports of local tribal leaders coming onboard with the U.S. — splitting from and turning against al-Qaida in Iraq — and pacifying the formerly deadly city of Ramadi.

Yet the U.S. military regularly loses more troops in al Anbar than in any other province but Baghdad. Early Friday, four more U.S. Marines reportedly were killed in combat operations there.