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Carter Reflects on Camp David Accords
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Carter Reflects on Camp David Accords

Carter Reflects on Camp David Accords

Deal Struck 25 Years Ago Remains a Ray of Hope in Mideast Gloom

Carter Reflects on Camp David Accords
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Web Extra: Listen to an extended version of Bob Edwards' interview with former President Carter.
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Anwar Sadat, Jimmy Carter and Menachem Begin sign 1978 Camp David Accords. National Archives, Carter White House Photographs Collection hide caption

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toggle caption National Archives, Carter White House Photographs Collection

Twenty-five years ago Wednesday, Egypt and Israel signed a framework for peace in the Middle East known as the Camp David Accords. President Jimmy Carter mediated between Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat. The 12 days of final negotiations took place at Camp David, the presidential retreat in Maryland.

Former President Carter will host members of the U.S., Egyptian and Israeli delegations to Camp David in Washington, D.C., today. NPR's Bob Edwards spoke with the former president earlier this week as he prepared for that event, sponsored by the Atlanta-based Carter Center. He was at his home in Plains, Ga.

Noting the current climate in the Middle East and renewed tensions between Israelis and Palestinians, Carter says the Camp David agreement shows lasting peace is possible in the region.

"The treaty that we worked out with Israel and Egypt... not a single word of it has been violated on either side," he tells Edwards.

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