NPR logo

Tony Snow Bidding Adieu to White House Post

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14358614/14359075" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Tony Snow Bidding Adieu to White House Post

Politics

Tony Snow Bidding Adieu to White House Post

Tony Snow Bidding Adieu to White House Post

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14358614/14359075" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

White House Press Secretary Tony Snow speaks during his daily briefing at the White House on Tuesday. Wednesday was Snow's last day to run the briefing. He leaves his White House job on Friday. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

White House Press Secretary Tony Snow speaks during his daily briefing at the White House on Tuesday. Wednesday was Snow's last day to run the briefing. He leaves his White House job on Friday.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Thursday was the last day behind the lectern for White House spokesman Tony Snow.

Snow will stay on the job through Friday, but he has handed over the daily press briefing to his successor, Dana Perino.

Snow said he loves his job, but he needs to earn more than the $168,000 a year he makes at the White House.

Snow, 52, took the job in April 2006. He said he was scared to death the first time he faced down the White House press corps, but now he enjoys it — and the growing unpopularity of the war in Iraq has not diminished that.

"I came here because I believed in what the president is doing," he said. "You continue to do your best to address the problems honestly and as best you can."

Snow is also battling a recurrence of colon cancer, but he said his illness was not a factor in his decision to leave. He recently finished a major, four-month chemotherapy treatment and, he said, he is feeling great. He is continuing with maintenance chemotherapy.

Snow said battling cancer is a big job for the patient, as well as family and friends.

He said he advises loved ones to treat patients just as they would anyone else, while patients must let people know what their needs are.

"I think what you do as a cancer patient is you make no secret of what you're going through. You welcome people's help and support," he said.

Beyond that, he said, the best advice is to embrace life.

Before going to the White House in April 2006, Snow was a conservative pundit and syndicated talk show host on Fox News Radio.

He now plans to go on the lecture circuit and may write a memoir.