Rick Ankiel: In Defense of Baseball's 'Un-Natural' Rick Ankiel of the St. Louis Cardinals — a pitcher who became a slugging outfielder, a la Babe Ruth — has admitted taking human growth hormone. But even a batter who lifts weights and takes protein supplements still has to connect to hit home runs.
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Rick Ankiel: In Defense of Baseball's 'Un-Natural'

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Rick Ankiel: In Defense of Baseball's 'Un-Natural'

Rick Ankiel: In Defense of Baseball's 'Un-Natural'

Rick Ankiel: In Defense of Baseball's 'Un-Natural'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14394875/14395078" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Rick Ankiel, photographed in February 2007. Doug Benc/Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Benc/Getty Images

Rick Ankiel, photographed in February 2007.

Doug Benc/Getty Images

Rick Ankiel of the St. Louis Cardinals — a pitcher who became a slugging outfielder after a long stint in the minors — has admitted taking human growth hormone during his uphill comeback. But let's give him a break — even a batter who lifts weights and takes protein supplements still has to connect to hit home runs.

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