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Governing Iraq

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Governing Iraq

Governing Iraq

Governing Iraq

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1445783/1445784" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The occupation of Iraq has put U.S. soldiers smack in the middle of local governance. On military maps, the country is divided into sectors "owned" — in army shorthand — by different battalions or brigades. Army officers are making decisions now that will directly affect Iraq once they are gone. In the northern city of Mosul, a major struggles to sort out city garbage collection. And in Sinjar, near the Syrian border, U.S. Lt. Col. Hank Arnold has a new title — viceroy. NPR's Emily Harris reports.

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