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Research Links Smelling Differences to Gene

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Research Links Smelling Differences to Gene

Research News

Research Links Smelling Differences to Gene

Research Links Smelling Differences to Gene

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A new study suggests that people smell scents differently because of their genes.

For example, a smell found in male body odor, called androstenone, has intrigued researchers for decades. Some people say it's like vanilla, others compare it to sweat or urine and some people can't smell it at all. Scientists have linked the difference to variations in the gene for the receptor that responds to the odor.

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