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Report Finds Fault in Sex Offender Laws

U.S.

Report Finds Fault in Sex Offender Laws

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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A new report from Human Rights Watch concludes that sex offender laws are based on faulty ideas and do little if anything to protect children. The report claims that the laws are written so broadly that they expose many people who pose no threat to children to ridicule, hatred and sometimes, violence.

Sarah Tofte, one of the authors of the Human Rights Watch report, "No Easy Answers: Sex Offender Laws in the United States"

Steve Roddel, founder of Family Watchdog, an online sex offender registry

Elizabeth Letourneau, assistant professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina

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