Staying in School Despite an Uncertain Future It's a paradox: Youths in the United States illegally can earn high-school and college degrees, but after graduation are likely to find themselves confined to the underground economy. Christian, 15, tells his story.
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Staying in School Despite an Uncertain Future

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Staying in School Despite an Uncertain Future

Staying in School Despite an Uncertain Future

Staying in School Despite an Uncertain Future

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Every year, American schools graduate roughly 65,000 students who are barred from legal employment because they don't have documentation. Even with a high-school diploma or college degree, they are likely to find themselves confined to the underground economy. Christian, a 15-year-old, tells his story as part of the "Radio Rookies" series from member station WNYC.