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Reality TV Hits the Kitchen: 'Nightmares'

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Reality TV Hits the Kitchen: 'Nightmares'

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Reality TV Hits the Kitchen: 'Nightmares'

Reality TV Hits the Kitchen: 'Nightmares'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14586548/14586385" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Kitchen Nightmares is a new reality TV show in which celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay whips ailing restaurants into shape. He usually finds rotten meat and moldy food. Then, in the great tradition of reality TV, he screams.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Here's an example of when something other than money motivates restaurant workers to do the dishes. Our last word in business, "Kitchen Nightmares." That's a TV reality show. It's new, in which celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay whips ailing restaurants into shape. He usually finds rotten meat and moldy food; then, in the great tradition of reality TV, he screams.

(Soundbite of TV show, "Kitchen Nightmares")

Mr. GORDON RAMSAY (Chef): (As Himself) That's not even lobster. That's just like baby food inside gunk. Who garnished that dish?

Unidentified Man #1: What?

Mr. RAMSAY: Who garnished the (bleep) dish?

Unidentified Man #2: You got to be kidding me.

MONTAGNE: Humiliation. Now, that's another kind of motivator.

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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