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Study: Bad In-Flight Air Exacerbated by Passengers

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Study: Bad In-Flight Air Exacerbated by Passengers

Research News

Study: Bad In-Flight Air Exacerbated by Passengers

Study: Bad In-Flight Air Exacerbated by Passengers

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14594337/14594329" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A new study has found that oils on passengers' hair, skin and clothing are partly to blame for stale in-flight air. Researchers show that ozone, which enters the cabin during flight, combines with oils and other materials to create potentially irritating airborne chemicals.

Charles Weschler, visiting professor at the International Center for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark; adjunct professor, of environmental and occupational medicine at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Rutgers University