Support the Troops, But Drop the Rhetoric From bumper stickers to bills in Congress, Americans agree we should back our fighting forces. But Col. Jim Currie, a professor at the National Defense University, says they shouldn't become political props.
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Support the Troops, But Drop the Rhetoric

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Support the Troops, But Drop the Rhetoric

Support the Troops, But Drop the Rhetoric

Support the Troops, But Drop the Rhetoric

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Be it a bumper sticker on a car or a bill in Congress, Americans have many different notions about how to show their support for U.S. forces in combat zones. Col. Jim Currie, a professor at the National Defense University, offers his insights in a conversation with Liane Hansen.