NPR logo

Stuffed Animals, Pillows Come Under TSA Scrutiny

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1465544/1465545" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Stuffed Animals, Pillows Come Under TSA Scrutiny

Stuffed Animals, Pillows Come Under TSA Scrutiny

Stuffed Animals, Pillows Come Under TSA Scrutiny

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1465544/1465545" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

First travelers had to leave their toenail clippers at home. Then, after Richard Reid tried to blow up a 2002 transatlantic flight with an explosive hidden in his sneaker, airport security personnel began inspecting shoes. Now the Department of Homeland Security has advised airlines to be on the lookout for suspicious-looking pillows, coats and stuffed animals. The Washington Post's John Mintz joins guest host John Ydstie to discuss how one might weaponize the stuffing of a teddy bear or pillow.

Guest:

John Mintz
*Washington Post reporter

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.