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Ex-Inmates Come Home

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Ex-Inmates Come Home

U.S.

Ex-Inmates Come Home

American RadioWorks Looks at Life After Prison

Ex-Inmates Come Home

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Steve Hopkins, a community organizer and ex-con who works to increase affordable housing in Durham. Steve Schapiro hide caption

American RadioWorks -- Hard Time: Life After Prison
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Steve Schapiro

A recent report by the U.S. Justice Department says that in addition to the 2.1 million Americans currently behind bars, the nation has about 4.3 million ex-inmates. Overall, one in 37 Americans has done prison time.

The figures also point out a staggering racial disparity. At the current rate a white male has a 1-in-17 chance of going to prison. For Hispanic men, the odds are 1-in-6. For black men, 1-in-3.

John Biewen of American RadioWorks explores how one predominantly black neighborhood in Durham, North Carolina tries to cope with a high incarceration rate and with the steady flow of returning ex-inmates.