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Hear NPR's Melissa Block and Scholar Joshua Kurlantzick

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Myanmar: A History of Near-Misses, and Protests

Myanmar: A History of Near-Misses, and Protests

Hear NPR's Melissa Block and Scholar Joshua Kurlantzick

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14738161/14738134" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Pro-democracy marches that are pitting Buddhist monks against Myanmar's ruling military junta recall the rallies of 1988, which led to the overthrow of the long-time military dictator General Ne Win. But democracy did not take root. Instead, army generals took over. And they have ruled Myanmar ever since.

Melissa Block talks with Joshua Kurlantzick, a visiting scholar in the China Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, who is the author of Charm Offensive, about China's relationship with Myanmar and other Asian countries.