Bird's-Eye View May Include Magnetic Fields A new study finds that migratory birds can "see" magnetic fields. Henrik Mouritsen, professor of neurosensory science at the University of Oldenberg in Germany, and his team observed the sensory abilities of garden warblers to learn how they sense compass directions.
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Bird's-Eye View May Include Magnetic Fields

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Bird's-Eye View May Include Magnetic Fields

Bird's-Eye View May Include Magnetic Fields

Bird's-Eye View May Include Magnetic Fields

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A new study finds that migratory birds can "see" magnetic fields. Scientist Henrik Mouritsen, professor of neurosensory science at the University of Oldenberg in Germany, tells NPR's Robert Siegel that his team observed the sensory abilities of garden warblers.

It has long been known that migratory birds, such as garden warblers, have an internal magnetic compass, but the new research suggests they sense the compass direction through their eyes.

The new study is published in the online journal PLoS One.

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