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Sea Wolf: Nostalgic, Yet Experimental

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Sea Wolf: Nostalgic, Yet Experimental

Sea Wolf: Nostalgic, Yet Experimental

Sea Wolf: Nostalgic, Yet Experimental

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14739523/15724278" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Sea Wolf

Sea Wolf is Alex Brown Church. hide caption

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Set List

  • "Winter Windows"
  • "Middle Distance Runner"
  • "The Garden That You Planted"
  • "You're a Wolf"

Born in the small town of Columbia, Calif., Sea Wolf's Alex Brown Church started out playing in an ad hoc bluegrass band for tourists in his hometown. As a kid, he and his mom trekked through Europe and the U.S., living in Alaska, Hawaii, and even in a tent in the French countryside for a year. But most of his formative years were spent in the Bay Area.

As the bassist and co-singer-songwriter in the L.A. indie-rock band Irving, Church cut his teeth helping create the group's signature alt-pop, neo-psychedelic sound. On his debut EP, Church puts his skills to good use crafting delicate, timeless pop gems. Get To The River Before It Runs Too Low conveys a clear sense of nostalgia, at times recalling classic songwriters like Mark Knopfler and Tom Petty. However, the arrangements also hint at a more experimental side, including cello and keyboard.

This segment originally aired on September 26, 2007.

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Leaves in the River

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