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Suicide Bomber Hits Kabul Bus Filled with Police

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Suicide Bomber Hits Kabul Bus Filled with Police

World

Suicide Bomber Hits Kabul Bus Filled with Police

Suicide Bomber Hits Kabul Bus Filled with Police

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14887187/14886393" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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For the second time in four days, Taliban fighters blew up a bus in Kabul during morning rush hour.

Both times, a suicide bomber tried to board an official bus and detonated a bomb that killed uniformed officers and civilians.

Bombings Target Police, Army

Officials say Tuesday morning's target was a police bus that had stopped to pick up officers on their way to work. The bomber wore his explosives under a traditional shawl, but officials say he raised enough suspicion that police officers began shooting at him as he boarded.

At least six police officers were killed in the explosion, as were three men and two children at the bus stop.

Saturday's bomber wore a stolen army uniform. He boarded an army bus picking up soldiers headed to their base. He detonated a bomb after being asked for his identification, which is a routine procedure.

At least 30 people died and several more were wounded.

Taliban Aims to Dissuade Recruits

Taliban spokesmen say these attacks are to show Afghans that Western troops and Afghan soldiers and policemen cannot provide them with security.

It is also aimed at dissuading young Afghans from joining the police or military, which pay decent salaries in this impoverished country.

The spokesmen added that the civilian victims in the bombings are martyrs in a just cause.

Karzai's Overture Angers Afghans

Afghans in Kabul said they blame the Taliban — not their government or Western forces — for such attacks.

Still, many are angry with President Hamid Karzai for publicly suggesting a meeting with Taliban leader Mullah Omar hours after Saturday's attack.

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