StoryCorps Griot: Fighting the Big Three

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Glinton

Sonari, (left), and Dorothy Glinton, (right) Courtesy of StoryCorps hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of StoryCorps

Today's installment of the StoryCorps Griot initiative comes from Dorothy Glinton.

She worked at Ford Motor Company's Chicago Assembly Plant for 30 years. She was one of the first women to hold a management position at the company. At StoryCorps, Glinton told her son, Sonari, how she came to work at Ford.

It was 1976 and she had just finished college and was working at a store in Chicago.

Glinton, who had two children at the time, needed money and Ford paid her more than she was making as a clerk.

She describes the working conditions at the plant as awful. She decided that she would apply for a job in management, since she had a college education and was therefore qualified for more responsibilities.

She was hired but soon faced discrimination from other male employees. She says that they felt like, "we were taking men's jobs."

In the mid-1990s, after working at Ford for 16 years, she was laid off while other workers at the plant with less seniority were transfered to other places. She decided to file a lawsuit.

After settling the suit, Glinton went back to work at the plant, and served on Ford's Diversity Council. She retired earlier this year.

StoryCorps Griot is currently in Holly Springs, Miss. All the Griot Initiative recordings are archived at the Library of Congress. A copy of each interview will also go to the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

This story was produced by Selly Thiam. Senior Producer for StoryCorps is Michael Garofalo.

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