Marion Jones' Fall from Grace Essayist John Hoberman, the author of Testosterone Dreams, comments on track star Marion Jones' admission that she used steroids before the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, where she won five medals. Until now, Jones had strongly denied doping allegations against her.
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Essayist John Hoberman, the author of Testosterone Dreams

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Marion Jones' Fall from Grace

Marion Jones' Fall from Grace

Essayist John Hoberman, the author of Testosterone Dreams

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/15046436/15046392" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Essayist John Hoberman, the author of Testosterone Dreams, comments on track star Marion Jones' admission that she used steroids before the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, where she won five medals. Until now, Jones had strongly denied doping allegations against her.

ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News, I'm Robert Siegel.

MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

John Hoberman is a sports historian who follows doping scandals. He was surprised by Jones' admission, but not for the reasons you might think of.

JOHN HOBERMAN: It is time to recognize that many of the athletes, who were held up to the sporting public as role models, inhabit an ethics-free zone where anything goes on behalf of boosting their performances and the careers they make possible.

NORRIS: John Hoberman is the author of "Testosterone Dreams." He's a professor at the University of Texas.

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