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Collegians Get Front-Row Seats to National Politics

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Collegians Get Front-Row Seats to National Politics

Election 2008

Collegians Get Front-Row Seats to National Politics

Collegians Get Front-Row Seats to National Politics

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/15067606/15067581" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The biggest party on college campuses? Well if you're in New Hampshire or Iowa, there are two — Democrats and Republicans.

Iowa's caucuses and New Hampshire's primary have a particular impact on national politics because of their front-and-center positions on the election calendar. Presidential candidates criss-cross the states, from county fairs to coffee shops to college campuses – making student leaders especially important to meet. Students often provide the man- and woman-power in elections, and two such students have met more candidates than many precinct captains.

Gregory Boguslavsky, a Dartmouth student and the president of the New Hampshire College Republicans, and Atul Nakhasi, student and president of the College Democrats at the University of Iowa, talk with Scott Simon.