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Homework: What Music Has Changed Your Life?

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Homework: What Music Has Changed Your Life?

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Homework: What Music Has Changed Your Life?

Homework: What Music Has Changed Your Life?

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For this week's homework assignment, tell us a story about how a piece of music changed your life. What music most influenced you over the years? Send your answers to watc@npr.org with the subject heading "Homework."

ANDREA SEABROOK, Host:

Many listeners wrote in after last week's show to tell us we'd been had. Luckily, your ears are often keener than our own. In the story about a cheating scandal at Hanover High School in New Hampshire, a student interviewed for the piece was identified by our reporter as - well, let's just replay the tape.

(SOUNDBITE OF PREVIOUS NPR RECORDING)

TOVIA SMITH: Junior Mike Rotch says the kids do deserve to be punished by their principal, but not by a prosecutor.

MIKE ROTCH: Yeah, I think they're really coming down...

SEABROOK: Did you catch that? We didn't. As any teacher probably could have told us, there is no student at Hanover High named Mike Rotch. And apparently, our reporter, our editor and every member of our staff missed that episode of "The Simpsons."

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SERIES, "THE SIMPSONS")

HANK AZARIA: (As Moe Szyslak) Moe's Tavern, where the elite meet to drink.

NANCY CARTWRIGHT: (As Bart Simpson) Ah, yeah. Hello. Is Mike there? Last name, Rotch.

AZARIA: (As Moe Szyslak) Hold on. I'll check. Mike Rotch? Mike Rotch? Hey, has anybody seen Mike Rotch lately?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

AZARIA: (As Moe Szyslak) Listen to me, you little puke. One of these days I'm going to catch you, and I'm going to carve my name on your back with an ice pick.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SEABROOK: Let's just say Hanover High one, NPR zero. A-plus for those of you who did your homework this week, and it was a hard assignment. We asked you to approach a complete stranger and get them to tell you about a time they lied or cheated.

Mary Lee Kirsten Day(ph) of Grundy Center, Iowa, wrote in that the clerk at her local convenience store admitted that he once asked a co-worker to cover for him for a few hours and then left for the whole night.

Vincent Mickelburough(ph) was getting a burger at a shop in Prescott, Arizona. He talked to a lady who said that when she was girl, she used to peek at other kids' tests. And she thinks lying and cheating is in human nature, but she asks Jesus for forgiveness.

Another faithful homework doer was Luigi Barrigan(ph). He found that - surprise, surprise - strangers he asked pretty much clammed up. Though, he got a lot of ums and blank stares, Barrigan said, he thoroughly enjoyed the exercise.

And now, for this week's assignment. We'll try to go easy on you this time. Tell us a story about how a piece of music changed your life. In a few minutes here, we have a story about a young boy inspired by the words of Bruce Springsteen. The boy is in India.

What music has changed you and how? Send us your story at npr.org, click on Contact Us. And in the subject line, put the word Homework.

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