Listeners Weigh in on Immigration, Evangelicals

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Hear listener feedback to the program's most recent stories on politics among Evangelicals and immigration raids.


And now, it's time for Backtalk, where we lift the curtain on conversations happening on the TELL ME MORE blog, and get a chance to hear from you, our listeners.

Lee Hill, our Web producer, joins me here in the studio as always.

Lee, how are you?

LEE HILL: Trying to fight off a cold, the bug that just might have come from my lovely host here.

MARTIN: Hey, say, that's how rumors get started.

HILL: You know what, I digress. Many of you know that Michel was fighting off a little something with her voice last week, but I think I'll be all right.

Let's talk immigration. We've had a few newsmaker interviews over the pass few days on the number of immigration topics. One of them was with Julie Myers, head of the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement, also known as ICE. We spoke to her about how her agency is stepping up raids targeting illegal immigrants.

Some say their efforts are inhumane, while others say the raids are absolutely necessary. Well, we can always count on one of our bloggers, Moji(ph) to weigh in when in comes to these hot-button issues. So, listen up, here's Moji's two cents.

MOJI (Blogger): I listened to this segment with the head of ICE twice, and I still had a stinking feeling that she wasn't telling the whole story. Some of these folks are now prisoners in their own homes where some of the ICE officials have barged their way in on some occasions. I noticed Julia Myers has found a way to dance around that issue in the segment. Others can't even take their American-born children to day Care or schools. I don't support illegal immigration in any way, but I believe there has to be an immigration reform where a legal pass is provided for immigrants to become permanent residents or citizens.

MARTIN: Thanks, Moji. It is an important topic, we're going to stay with it.

Next, another issue that has folks talking - the weight of the evangelical vote in the 2008 Presidential Elections. Richard Cizik of the National Association of Evangelicals told me that people shouldn't be so quick to assume that Evangelical Christians are joined at the hip to the Republican Party. Well, Lee, that didn't sit too well with Sarah(ph). Let's listen to what she had to say.

SARAH (Blogger): He's talking about not liking the way folks assume Evangelical Christians are associated with the GOP or are a monolith. Oh, for crying out loud, they are the ones who did that to themselves. Do they not remember 1994? Do they not remember the moral majority and its strong swing the GOPs? Surely, he can't expect us listening to discount the fact that the evangelicals bought the GOP all by themselves. And now, it's their problem that they've been so strongly associated. And just for the record, I am a Christian. I love Jesus and accept Him as my Lord and Savior. But an Evangelical, I am not.

HILL: And just for the record, Michel, I just know that when someone says for crying out loud, she means business.

MARTIN: You know that's right. What else, Lee?

HILL: Oh, well, we have a note from Carey(ph), she's one of our newer listeners to TELL ME MORE on WAMU 885 here in Washington. Carey says I listen to WAMU and love your show. I like the topics and your manner. I'm glad your show is now a part of my day.

MARTIN: Why thank you, Carey. And thank you, Lee.

HILL: Thank you, Michel.

MARTIN: And we want to hear more from you. Remember tell us more about what you think. Go to and blog it out.

That's our program for today.

(Soundbite of music)

MARTIN: I am Michel Martin. You've been listening to TELL ME MORE from NPR News and the African-American Public Radio Consortium. Let's talk more on Monday.

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