NPR logo

Out of Ink? Try Printing Live Cells

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/15231206/15231203" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Out of Ink? Try Printing Live Cells

Research News

Out of Ink? Try Printing Live Cells

Out of Ink? Try Printing Live Cells

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/15231206/15231203" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers have successfully "printed" bacteria, yeast, and animal cells using the common home-office technology of inkjet printing. Using printing technology is of interest to biomaterials researchers because it is a precise, simple, rapid and clean process that avoids contamination.

Scientists are currently examining ways to manipulate living cells using the same technology. Is it realistic to imagine 'printing' living tissue?

Guest:

Paul Calvert, professor in the department of materials and textiles, University of Massachusetts

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.