Out of Ink? Try Printing Live Cells Researchers have successfully "printed" bacteria, yeast, and animal cells using common home-office inkjet printing technology. Scientists are currently examining ways to manipulate living cells using the same technology.
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Out of Ink? Try Printing Live Cells

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Out of Ink? Try Printing Live Cells

Out of Ink? Try Printing Live Cells

Out of Ink? Try Printing Live Cells

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/15231206/15231203" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers have successfully "printed" bacteria, yeast, and animal cells using the common home-office technology of inkjet printing. Using printing technology is of interest to biomaterials researchers because it is a precise, simple, rapid and clean process that avoids contamination.

Scientists are currently examining ways to manipulate living cells using the same technology. Is it realistic to imagine 'printing' living tissue?

Guest:

Paul Calvert, professor in the department of materials and textiles, University of Massachusetts