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College Cracks Down on Throwing Up on Bus

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College Cracks Down on Throwing Up on Bus

Education

College Cracks Down on Throwing Up on Bus

College Cracks Down on Throwing Up on Bus

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Students at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., will now be fined $300 if they are drunk and throw up on a school shuttle bus. The bus runs around the clock between the school's Foggy Bottom campus, near the bars of Georgetown, and its Mount Vernon dorms.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

(Soundbite of music)

Graduates of 2008, remember education is a journey, not a destination. And sometimes you have to pay to clean what you messed up on the way. This week, George Washington University warns students they could be fined $300 if they regurgitate on the Vern shuttle bus.

The Vern is a round-the-clock shuttles so named because it runs between G.W.'s Foggy Bottom campus, adjacent to the taverns of Georgetown and its Mt. Vernon dormitories.

Onboard whoopsies can be costly. Only one bus is usually in service overnight so the driver has to stop the bus and pay cabs to bring the students home. And seats aboard the Vern are upholstered. Let's just say, you don't just hose down upholstered seats.

Safria Shaw(ph), a freshman from Pennsylvania, told The Washington Post, they just target the Vern seems to be random. People throw up all the time in the dorms. They throw up in the elevator. They throw up everywhere.

By the way, parents, it now cost over $50,000 a year to send a student to G.W. Drinks and tips included?

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