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New Telescope Array Is Turned to the Sky

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New Telescope Array Is Turned to the Sky

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New Telescope Array Is Turned to the Sky

New Telescope Array Is Turned to the Sky

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/15452157/15452150" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Forty two of 350 radio telescopes were brought on line recently as part of the Allen Telescope Array. Seth Shostak/SETI Institute hide caption

toggle caption Seth Shostak/SETI Institute

Forty two of 350 radio telescopes were brought on line recently as part of the Allen Telescope Array.

Seth Shostak/SETI Institute

Astronomers have switched on 42 radio dishes of a telescope array in Northern California. A total of 350 dishes are planned for the Allen Telescope Array, which will allow astronomers to image large portions of the sky in one exposure — and search for extraterrestrial life.

The operators of the telescope say its design will allow rapid astronomical observations and analysis. Leo Blitz, one of the project leaders, talks about the telescope and what it will be doing in the years ahead.

Guest:

Leo Blitz, director of the Allen Telescope Array; professor of astronomy and director of the Radio Astronomy Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley

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