Education

College Tuition Outpaces Inflation

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The increase means more growth for the student-loan industry.

LUKE BURBANK, host:

Welcome back to THE BRYANT PARK PROJECT from NPR News. We're always available online for you at npr.org/bryantpark. I'm Luke Burbank.

ALISON STEWART, host:

And I'm Alison Stewart.

Coming up: there's big green in greens - forest thieves pilfering branches, moss, and even big chunks of wood for sale on the black market. We'll talk to a deputy sheriff who's beat is the big woods.

But first, let's go to Rachel Martin for today's headlines.

Unidentified Man: This is NPR.

RACHEL MARTIN, host:

Hey, good morning, everyone.

President Bush has declared an emergency in parts of Southern California ravaged by wildfires. The declaration is part of an attempt to speed up the delivery of federal disaster relief to seven Southern California counties. The fires have forced more than a quarter of a million people to flee their homes, like Peter Colbach(ph), who lives outside of Santa Clarita. He and his family fled their home on Sunday. A day later, it was destroyed.

Mr. PETER COLBACH (Resident, Santa Clarita): We just had a very minimal amount of time to put anything in either truck, including our children, and hightail it down the canyon. I drove back up. I came to where our house used to stand and it - just complete ashes.

MARTIN: More than 800 homes and businesses have been damaged or destroyed by the wind-driven fires. One person has died, and at least 16 firefighters and 25 other people have been reported injured.

The price of getting a private higher education is going up, even more than usual. According to data released by the College Board, the annual cost of attending a private four-year college in the United States rose almost four percent this school year. That's the biggest inflation adjusted increase in the past six years.

According to Bloomberg News, the report's chief author says schools may have raised prices in anticipation of a higher inflation rate. And while families get stuck with higher tuition, the rise in prices means more growth for the private student loan industry.

Have you seen it, the new Wes Anderson's film called "Darjeeling Limited?" Well, it's apparently not doing so hot at the box office, so the film's distributor has decided that when the film is released nationwide next Friday, it will come packaged with another short film that will air before the feature.

The 13-minute movie, also directed by Anderson, stars one of the characters in "The Darjeeling Limited." Till now, it's been available on iTunes only and it's been getting lots of high praise. The hope is appearing the short film with "The Darjeeling Limited" will boost ticket sales for the feature film.

Finally, today, what's not to love? It's leafy and green, packed with vitamins. Dana Carvey sang a love song about it on "Saturday Night Live." It's broccoli. And if all of that wasn't enough to make you love the green leafy vegetable, new research has shown that broccoli can help prevent skin cancer.

The research by John Hopkins School of Medicine was published yesterday in the online edition of the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. It says broccoli - or rather the juice squeezed out of broccoli - has been proven to block ultraviolet sunlight that can cause cancer.

A broccoli extract that would be aimed at consumers is still in the early stages of development. Scientists are still trying to figure out how to remove the green pigments that would give users a temporary greenish hue.

That's the news. It's always online at npr.org.

Unidentified Man: This is NPR.

Luke and Alison, did you eat your broccoli today?

BURBANK: I would - I'd take skin cancer.

(Soundbite of laughter)

STEWART: A broccoli before 4 a.m., not usually in my diet. But I can work in that for tomorrow. Thanks, Rachel.

MARTIN: Thanks. You're welcome.

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