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Nuclear Power 101

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Nuclear Power 101

Nuclear Power 101

Nuclear Power 101

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Win Rosenfeld/Win Rosenfeld/Bryant Park Project

Scientists used Albert Einstein's theory of relativity in creating both atomic energy and the atom bomb. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Scientists used Albert Einstein's theory of relativity in creating both atomic energy and the atom bomb.

AFP/Getty Images

With the Senate considering financial backing for the construction of nuclear reactors, physics professor David Morgan explains exactly how nuclear energy works, how it differs from nuclear weapons, how it can go wrong and how it can help to address climate change.

Morgan, who teaches at Eugene Lang College in New York, says that every time he hears someone say "nyoocular," it's as though he's been stabbed in the temple with a fork. Don't miss his interview, the second installment in our four-part series on the resurgence of atomic energy.