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What to Do With Nuclear Waste?

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What to Do With Nuclear Waste?

What to Do With Nuclear Waste?

What to Do With Nuclear Waste?

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A winning design from the Desert Space Foundation's contest to design a universal warning sign for the Yucca Mountain site. Brandon Alms/Desert Space Foundation hide caption

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Brandon Alms/Desert Space Foundation

The nuclear power industry wants a $50 billion safety net for new plants, but the old question of dealing with nuclear waste remains a problem.

George Lobsenz of Energy Daily digs into the federal government's proposed storage site, Nevada's Yucca Mountain, and we consider the challenge of creating a warning sign people can understand in 10,000 years.

Alison Stewart suggests something in red, a color that she argues people naturally read as a warning. A couple of years ago, the Desert Space Foundation sponsored a contest to create a sign for Yucca Mountain.

On our blog, we throw the question to you. What kind of sign would still be readable as a warning of radioactive waste to a human living 10,000 years from now?