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Wildfires Spare Homeowner's Rebuilt House

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Wildfires Spare Homeowner's Rebuilt House

U.S.

Wildfires Spare Homeowner's Rebuilt House

Wildfires Spare Homeowner's Rebuilt House

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/15627408/15627397" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chris Dudas never thought twice about rebuilding his house after it burned down four years ago in the Cedar fire. Dudas' recently completed rebuilt home was threatened again — this time by the Witch Creek fire.

During the 2003 fire, Dudas says he and his family had 20 minutes to evacuate as a wall of fire moved toward his home. This time, the fires never got that close. Dudas and his family voluntarily evacuated on Monday and were home on Tuesday.

Still, the possibly of losing another home to a wildfire did lead Dudas and his wife to consider relocating to the much wetter Pacific Northwest. But for now, he and his family will stay.

Dudas talks to Madeleine Brand about the two ordeals.

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