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Tough Talk Against Iran Turns to Tough Action

World

Tough Talk Against Iran Turns to Tough Action

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On Thursday morning, the Bush administration announced a series of economic sanctions against Iran. In a recent interview with Esquire magazine, Flynt Leverett, a former senior director for Middle East policy at the National Security Council, details his concern that the United States is gearing up to wage an attack.

Guest:

Flynt Leverett, senior fellow at the New America Foundation; former senior director for Middle East affairs at the National Security Council

U.S. Imposes New Sanctions Against Iran

U.S. Imposes New Sanctions Against Iran

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The United States said Thursday it is imposing new sanctions against Iraq's neighbor, Iran.

Two top advisors to President Bush say they want to punish Iran for supporting terrorist organizations. They also want Iran to curb its nuclear ambitions.

The U.S. is acting alone — without other governments — but hopes to pressure foreign companies to comply.

These sanctions are aimed specifically at Iran's defense ministry, its Revolutionary Guard Corps and a number of banks.

Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said the measures are in response to "a comprehensive policy to confront the threatening behavior of the Iranians."

She made mention of Iran spurning an offer of open negotiations, implying that the U.S. has offered to talk with Iran, but only if it suspends its nuclear activities first.

Rice says the United States remains open to "a diplomatic solution."

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