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Bratz Dolls Bump Barbie

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Bratz Dolls Bump Barbie

Business

Bratz Dolls Bump Barbie

Toys Come with Pouty Lips, Skimpy Tops -- and Controversy

Bratz Dolls Bump Barbie

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1565710/1568172" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Bratzpackers Cloe (left) and Jade. Elaine Korry, NPR hide caption

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toggle caption Elaine Korry, NPR

Bratz in their streetwear. Elaine Korry, NPR hide caption

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toggle caption Elaine Korry, NPR

One of the hottest-selling toys this year is a group of fashion dolls called the "Bratzpack," and they've replaced Barbie in the hearts of millions of girls. In a few short years, the Bratz brand has become a retailing powerhouse. Their maker, MGA Entertainment, says the brand and its licensees will pull in $3 billion this year.

The dolls — Cloe, Dana, Jade, Sasha, and Yasmin — portray teenagers with attitude. They have big doe eyes, lush pouty lips and wear skimpy tops, platform boots, and tons of glitz. The Bratz have taken top honors at a slew of toy of the year awards, but, as NPR's Elaine Korry reports, the dolls' edgy style and brassy makeup makes them controversial.

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