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NPR's Alex Chadwick and 'Los Angeles Times' reporter Richard Marosi discuss immigrants using the fires as a diversion.
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Border Fires Offer Migrants Deadly Opportunity

Border Fires Offer Migrants Deadly Opportunity

NPR's Alex Chadwick and 'Los Angeles Times' reporter Richard Marosi discuss immigrants using the fires as a diversion.
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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/15661142/15661109" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The second-largest wildfire in Southern California is still burning out of control along the U.S.-Mexico border. That's giving illegal immigrants a unique opportunity to cross the border at abandoned stations — but it could also mean death. Four charred bodies have been found in what is thought to be a migrant camp.

Los Angeles Times reporter Richard Marosi says the region where the wildfires took place is a very mountainous, difficult areas to control. It's also a difficult are for migrants to cross. Still, some people are trying

At one location along the border near Tecate, Mexico, Border Patrol agents locked the gate between the U.S. and Mexico as they fled the wildfire. Marosi says the lock was cut within minutes.

The border was one of the hardest regions hit by wildfires, but some migrants probably didn't think twice about trying to cross, Marosi says.

Marosi, who is covering the story, talks to Alex Cohen.

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