Study: Voters Take First Impressions to the Polls A new study has found that in less than one second, people can predict the winners of political elections with 70 percent accuracy — simply by glancing at pictures of the candidates. The study suggests that when it comes to voting, appearance and first impressions are no small factor.
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Study: Voters Take First Impressions to the Polls

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Study: Voters Take First Impressions to the Polls

Study: Voters Take First Impressions to the Polls

Study: Voters Take First Impressions to the Polls

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/15667560/15667652" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new study has found that in less than one second, people can predict the winners of political elections with 70 percent accuracy — simply by glancing at pictures of the candidates. The study suggests that when it comes to voting, appearance and first impressions are no small factor.

Guest:

Alexander Todorov, assistant professor of psychology and public affairs, Princeton University