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Southeast U.S. Parched by Continuing Drought

Environment

Southeast U.S. Parched by Continuing Drought

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A drought has severely depleted water resources in the Southeast, and reservoir levels are so low that the governor of Georgia has declared a water supply emergency in the northern part of the state. Guests discuss the impact the drought has had on the region and how the crisis is being managed.

Guests:

Susana Capelouto, news director, Georgia Public Radio

Brian Fuchs, climatologist specialist at the National Drought Mitigation Center and author, United States Drought Monitor

Parched Georgia Calls State of Emergency

Parched Georgia Calls State of Emergency

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Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue declared a state of emergency in 85 counties during the weekend, as a drought continued to plague much of the Southeast.

Michele Norris talks with Jackie Joseph, who lives on the shore of Lake Sidney Lanier, a dwindling reservoir that supplies the Atlanta metropolitan region with much of its water; and to Gov. Perdue about Atlanta's water supplies.