NPR logo

Human Clones: Where's Baby Eve?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1575178/1575861" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Human Clones: Where's Baby Eve?

Science

Human Clones: Where's Baby Eve?

A Look at Claims: Past, Present and Future

Human Clones: Where's Baby Eve?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1575178/1575861" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Human Clones: Where's Baby Eve?

Only Available in Archive Formats.

Clonaid CEO Brigitte Boisselier, at a December 2002 news conference in Florida, claimed the company had delivered the world's first human clone, a baby girl called Eve. Reuters Limited hide caption

toggle caption
Reuters Limited

Several fertility doctors around the world maintain they are planning to clone a human baby. For a time late last year, it seemed possible that human cloning had been accomplished. On Dec. 27, 2002, Brigitte Boisselier held a press conference in Florida, announcing the birth of the first human clone, called Eve.

A year later, Boisselier, who directs a company set up by the Raelian religious sect, has offered no proof that the baby Eve exists, let alone that she is a clone. NPR's Joe Palca reports on what's happened in the field of cloning since Boisselier's 2002 announcement.