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Bad-Disk Reboot: Back Pain May Not Mean Surgery

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Bad-Disk Reboot: Back Pain May Not Mean Surgery

Bad-Disk Reboot: Back Pain May Not Mean Surgery

Bad-Disk Reboot: Back Pain May Not Mean Surgery

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/15807449/15807560" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

James Weinstein, M.D., chairs Dartmouth College's orthopedic-surgery department; he's considered one of the nation's leading experts on low-back pain.

Weinstein says a multi-year study examining different treatments for lumbar disk herniation shows that surgery isn't necessarily a better choice than non-operative treatments. He says that there is little difference in outcomes, and he's an advocate of conservative, non-invasive treatment.

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