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Justice on 'The Windward Side' of Guantanamo

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Justice on 'The Windward Side' of Guantanamo

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Justice on 'The Windward Side' of Guantanamo

Justice on 'The Windward Side' of Guantanamo

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Clive Stafford Smith's book asks what happens to democracy when the rule of law is compromised in the name of fighting terrorism. Ian Robinson hide caption

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Ian Robinson

Clive Stafford Smith is one of just a few people who've had independent access to the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay. He's a human rights lawyer representing dozens of the prisoners held there, and he says countless innocent men have been held at Gitmo for years with no meaningful review of the accusations against them. Many of them, he says, have suffered terrible abuse.

In Eight O'Clock Ferry to the Windward Side: Seeking Justice in Guantanamo Bay, Smith details the abuses and absurdities of life inside the legal black hole of the prison camp.

Smith works as legal director of Reprieve, a U.K.-based organization that represents "prisoners denied justice by powerful governments across the world, especially those governments that should be upholding the highest standards when it comes to fair trials," according to its Web site. In addition to his work at Guantanamo, Smith has spent nearly two decades representing death-row inmates in the southern United States.

Books Featured In This Story

Eight O'Clock Ferry to the Windward Side

Seeking Justice in Guantanamo Bay

by Clive Stafford Smith

Hardcover, 307 pages |

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Title
Eight O'Clock Ferry to the Windward Side
Subtitle
Seeking Justice in Guantanamo Bay
Author
Clive Stafford Smith

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