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Powerpuff Girls Reinvented for Japanese Audience

Pop Culture

Powerpuff Girls Reinvented for Japanese Audience

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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The original Powerpuff Girls were preteen karate superheroes. Their image has been revamped (below) for overseas viewers . TM & © 2007 Cartoon Network. All Rights Reserved. hide caption

toggle caption TM & © 2007 Cartoon Network. All Rights Reserved.

The three preteen, karate-kicking superheroes have grown up and gotten a serious makeover: The Powerpuff Girls have been altered — a process called "transcreation" — to appeal to viewers in Japan. They are among many other American characters being adapted for overseas audiences.

Guests:

Amy Chozick, author of the article, "Cartoon Characters Get Big Makeover for Overseas Fans," appearing in The Wall Street Journal

Craig McCracken, creator of the Powerpuff Girls

Japanese Powerpuff Girls
TM & © 2007 Cartoon Network. All Rights Reserved.

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