Primary Objective: Tell a Tale of the Campaign Trail

D.C. Contest Tests One Reporter's Ability to Find the 'News'

Garfield cornered man on the street Juan Maldanado, left.

Garfield cornered man on the street Juan Maldanado (left), associate general counsel of the D.C. Lottery Board, under the Largest Chair in the World. Art Silverman, NPR News hide caption

itoggle caption Art Silverman, NPR News
Garfield at Ben's Chili Bowl, where politicians converge to mix with the proletariat.

Garfield at Ben's Chili Bowl, where politicians converge to mix with the proletariat. Art Silverman, NPR News hide caption

itoggle caption Art Silverman, NPR News

The presidential primaries are an opportunity for the media to swarm like four-year locusts on New Hampshire and Iowa, where no cliché is too threadbare, no observation too obvious, no ritual too superficial to be presented to the American public as news.

Not one to be left behind, All Things Considered dispatched On the Media co-host Bob Garfield to find the primary story to end all primary stories. And he finds it not in Iowa or New Hampshire, but in the nation's capital.

This Tuesday, D.C. voters will turn out for a primary election that may have no impact on Democratic convention delegates. Garfield takes the city's primary pulse.

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