Study Links Gene to High Metabolism, Cold Climes A new study in the journal Science suggests DNA mutations have helped humans to adapt to colder weather. The study identifies a gene that seems to help some bodies burn calories more quickly than others, making them more likely to survive freezing temperatures. NPR's Richard Harris reports.
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Study Links Gene to High Metabolism, Cold Climes

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Study Links Gene to High Metabolism, Cold Climes

Study Links Gene to High Metabolism, Cold Climes

Study Links Gene to High Metabolism, Cold Climes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1590412/1590413" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A new study in the journal Science suggests DNA mutations have helped humans to adapt to colder weather. The study identifies a gene that seems to help some bodies burn calories more quickly than others, making them more likely to survive freezing temperatures. NPR's Richard Harris reports.