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Letters: Comments and Corrections
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Letters: Comments and Corrections

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Letters: Comments and Corrections

Letters: Comments and Corrections
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This week, listners sent in comments on John Ydstie's story on the Wye House Farm and Daniel Pinkwater's on-air reading. There were also some corrections.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

Time now for your letters.

(Soundbite of typewriter)

SIMON: Two weeks ago, we broadcast John Ydstie's story about descendants of slaves and slave owners exploring the history of the Wye House farm, a former plantation in Maryland.

Josina Cooper-Guest(ph) of Philadelphia wrote: When I was a child of the 1980s, my nana, Aretha Cooper(ph), brought my siblings and me to the Wye plantation where she and other members of the family conducted research on our ancestor, Steven Bailey, who was a cousin and possible half-brother of Frederick Douglass. Both Douglass and Bailey were fathered by unnamed white men, perhaps one of the cruel overseers that you described in your piece. In 2004, a family reunion gathered at Wye to tour the big house and walk the grounds.

My nana, who did loads of valuable genealogical research, died four years ago and would be so delighted to know that there are archeologists and NPR reporters working to uncover and give voice to more of the stories that lay silently in the ground of the Wye plantation.

And a correction. I misspoke in our conversation last week with Dan Schorr when I quoted Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell as saying that the SCHIP program began under a Republican president. In fact, Senator McConnell actually said it was a Republican Congress that passed the bill in 1997 and President Clinton who signed it into law.

Ben Fishel of Media Matters for America pointed out my mistake, which is my mistake, and not Senator McConnell's.

Our ambassador to the World of Children's literature, Daniel Pinkwater, has a fan in one Patricia Fordney(ph) at Albuquerque, New Mexico, who writes: Thank you so much for reading part of "Little Toot" and letting your listeners know that the book still exist. It was the first book my first-grade teacher, back in the late '40s, read to us, perhaps that's when I fell in love with books.

Finally, a salute to Colorado Rockies fans. Keith and Gerald Chamberlain(ph) of Denver wrote last Saturday that when Howard Bryant said, in the first year, the Rockies broke National League attendance records, my husband and I smiled. We were the fans who broke the attendance record that had been held by the Dodgers. Yes, we are going to the game tomorrow night and we'll wear our two-of-a-kind National League attendance record 1993 jackets. Thanks for the fond memory reminder.

SIMON: Mr. and Mrs. Chamberlain, we're sorry for your loss. The Rocks had a great season. It was fun to watch them in the playoffs and also it is, you Rockies fans, at least know to keep your hands to yourself when fly balls come near.

(Soundbite of music)

Unidentified Man (Singer): (Singing) If I pitch, can you catch? Will you hold the ball, when you stands to the plate, will you swing and fall? If you play, we got to know who how it's done, can you catch, can you hold on the hard ball? I mean, baby, do you know the game?

SIMON: Please send us your comments and corrections. You can come to our Web site, npr.org. And please remember to tell us where you live and how to pronounce your name.

This is NPR News.

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