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Georgia Plant Is First for Making Ethanol from Waste

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Georgia Plant Is First for Making Ethanol from Waste

Environment

Georgia Plant Is First for Making Ethanol from Waste

Georgia Plant Is First for Making Ethanol from Waste

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Not all ethanol is created equal. Scientists say the real hope for curbing greenhouse gas emissions and pursuing energy independence lies in cellulosic ethanol. That's ethanol that could be brewed from things like corn stalks, straw, wood chips — things we normally throw away.

Companies have been racing to find cost-effective ways to make this form of ethanol. A company called Range Fuels in Georgia is scheduled to break ground Tuesday on the world's first plant for making cellulosic ethanol.

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